Wednesday, October 06, 2010

POLITICS, MURDER, AND LOVE IN STALIN'S KREMLIN - there's a giveaway!

The winner is cories5 - congratulations! If you'll email me your mailing info at ljodamron@gmail.com I'll get your book in the mail. If I don't hear from cories5 by Sunday, I'll draw another name. Thanks so much to everyone for your interest. My oldest daughter is a history major and she is anxious to read it too!


This isn't the sort of romance that I typically chat about here, but Paul R. Gregory has a book that released earlier this year (April, 2010), POLITICS, MURDER, AND LOVE IN STALIN'S KREMLIN The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina, and while I haven't read it, it sounds fascinating. I have a copy for giveaway to one of my readers here. Read the description and if you too are intrigued, simply leave a comment and your name will be in the draw. I'll let this one run a while, drawing a name on Tuesday, October 12th. Know a history buff? Please send them over!
About the book:
In Politics, Murder, and Love in Stalin’s Kremlin: The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina, Paul Gregory sheds light on how the world’s first socialist state went terribly wrong and why it was likely to veer off course through the story of two of Stalin’s most prominent victims. A founding father of the Soviet Union at the age of twenty-nine, Nikolai Bukharin was the editor of Pravda and an intimate of Lenin’s exile. (Lenin later dubbed him “the favorite of the party.”) But after Bukharin crossed swords with Stalin over their differing visions of the world’s first socialist state, he paid the ultimate price with his life. His wife, Anna Larina, the stepdaughter of a high Bolshevik official, spent much of her life in prison camps and in exile after her husband’s execution.
Drawn from Hoover Institution archival documents, the story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina begins with the optimism of the socialist revolution and then turns into a dark saga of foreboding and terror as the game changes from political struggle to physical survival. Told for the most part in the words of the participants, it is, as Robert Conquest says in his foreword, “a story told to show the horrors of fate, of personal mistreatment and suffering by real people.” It is also a story of courage and cowardice, strength and weakness, misplaced idealism, missed opportunities, bungling, and, above all, love.

Here's a link to Amazon for anyone who wants to snag a copy for themselves or if you want more information!
Thanks for checking it out!
Laurie

6 comments:

Ammy Belle said...

Just up my alley! I am in fact, a history major and the Russian story in the 20th century is fascinating - especially the area of Stalin's depart from Lenin and such.

Thanks for the giveaway! Can't wait to pick this up!

catslady said...

I always love stories based on fact. It's been a long while since I've read anything having to do with Russia but I enjoy edgy and this sounds intriguing.

cories5 said...

I was just listening to an audiobook about the cold war. This book sounds good to me.

cories119[at]yahoo.com

Maureen said...

It looks pretty interesting and my husband enjoys reading about and watching shows about history.

Karin said...

If you haven't already chosen a winner, I'd love to be entered. This sounds like something I would really enjoy, especially after my visit to Russia.

cories5 said...

Wow! Thank you! I emailed you already!

cories119[at]yahoo.com